Cars

3 Dramatic Ways Our Cars and Roads May Soon Look Different – Architectural Digest

Summary

Human-derived climate change—and the droughts, floods, fires, and other environmental crises connected to it—have made it abundantly clear that we have to rethink our priorities when it comes to transportation. Simply continuing to burn carbon-based fuels to power our vehicles, churning out unconscionable quantities of tailpipe emissions, is no longer tenable.

Some of these changes will require major shifts in how we engage with our infrastructure, as well as what it looks like, and…….

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Human-derived climate change—and the droughts, floods, fires, and other environmental crises connected to it—have made it abundantly clear that we have to rethink our priorities when it comes to transportation. Simply continuing to burn carbon-based fuels to power our vehicles, churning out unconscionable quantities of tailpipe emissions, is no longer tenable.

Some of these changes will require major shifts in how we engage with our infrastructure, as well as what it looks like, and how it functions. To this end, researchers around the world are creating, developing, and testing new technologies that can support these changes. Recent developments include a trio of compelling concepts.

The Indiana Department of Transport (INDOT) is currently working with several groups to create roadways that could provide constant, high-speed, wireless charging for the public.

Photo: Courtesy of Magment

Magnetic Cement: Charging time—the additional minutes or hours it takes to provide a power re-up for an electric vehicle (E.V.), versus a gasoline vehicle—is one of the core issues that dissuades consumers and industry from shifting to battery-powered vehicles. Wireless charging is an established technology that works to provide electricity to portable devices like your cell phone. So there has been significant work done investigating how E.V.s can be wirelessly charged, especially while on the road.

The Indiana Department of Transport (INDOT) is currently working with the National Science Foundation, Purdue University, and a German company called Magment to create roadways that could provide constant, high-speed, wireless charging, which would be available to E.V. owners and operators on the move, as they drive. The concept involves cement that has magnetized particles embedded in it, allowing it to provide an accessible wireless electrical charge. The roadbed material will first need to be tested in a laboratory setting, then in a sample roadway, to see if Magment’s claims of robust and efficient wireless electricity transmission are valid, and then whether the roads can be constructed at a viable and safe cost.

This technology could be especially useful for providing consistent power to a new generation of electrified, long-distance trucks, as the amount of freight being carried by trucks continues to increase significantly with our reliance on e-commerce, and diesel-powered tractor trailers are a key source of climate change–causing greenhouse gas emissions.

Source: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/dramatic-ways-our-cars-roads-may-soon-look-different